Beware of These Top 10 Investment Scams (Updated List for 2011/2012)!!!

HAT TIP: Ric Edelman (Education / Investing Your Money)


Beware of These Top 10 Investment Scams – Follow your nose. If an offer smells fishy, it’s probably bad.  Updated December 2011

Recent worries about the economy, coupled with poor investment performance, have caused some consumers to swear off traditional, well-known investments in favor of others that offer promises of higher returns and lower risks. But be careful: Many of those investment offers are actually frauds, and you’ll lose all the money you spend on them.

To help you avoid getting ripped off, the North American Securities Administrators Association offers the following “Top 10” list of investment scams. If you’ve invested in any of these, talk with us or your state securities regulator right away.

Products
1. Distressed real estate schemes. Investment pools targeting distressed property are increasingly popular with con artists. Do your homework before investing in properties that are bank-owned, in foreclosure, pending short sales or otherwise in distress. Just like other securities, real estate ventures must be registered with state securities regulators. [Breitling had ought to relate to this scam – right??? LOL!!!  Did you see our two posts on this? LINKS:  POST 1  and  POST 2  ]

2. Energy investments. Swindlers tout the mystique of untapped oil and gas reserves and bountiful production. Even genuine oil and gas investments bear a high degree of risk. Understand that you could lose your total investment, even in legitimate ventures. Energy investments tend to be poor alternatives if you are seeking income in retirement.

3. Gold and precious metals. Higher prices and the promise of an ever-appreciating “tangible” asset have lured the unsuspecting into a variety of scams. Many recent ones are variations on old themes — like a promoter seeking capital for extraction equipment to reopen a long-dormant mine in exchange for a full refund plus interest and a stake in the mine. In another case, operators claimed to have special coins or nuggets they would store or trade for investors in special markets for high profits and returns.

4. Promissory notes. Unregistered or fraudulent promissory notes give a false sense of security with promises or guarantees of fixed interest rates and safety of principal. However, even legitimate notes carry risk. Most promissory notes and their sellers must be registered with state securities regulators. Such notes often are covers for Ponzi schemes and other scams. Check with your state regulator.

5. Securitized life-settlement contracts. Legitimate life-settlement contracts involve a high degree of risk; investors may be responsible for routinely paying costly premiums for people who outlive their life expectancies. Now crooks are embracing new schemes to deceive even cautious investors into believing that contracts with added securities such as bonds are safe. Many have left victims holding worthless paper. Practices

6. Affinity fraud. Marketing a scheme to members of a particular group continues to be lucrative for Ponzi scheme operators and other fraudsters. The elderly or retired and religious and ethnic groups are common targets because scammers rely on trust. Examples: A member of a large Amish community recently bilked his brethren of millions of dollars in an investment scam. And a trusted officer of a Croatian credit union was accused of stealing members’ deposits over several years.

7. Bogus or exaggerated credentials. These are used to imply special expertise or training in advising senior citizens on financial matters. Despite laws in 29 states to curb the practice, there is an increase in the use of bogus credentials or designations such as nonexistent law degrees or CPA certificates and expired or nonexistent CRD numbers. Always press for full disclosure and the meaning behind all designations, and check to confirm with your state regulator.

8. Mirror trading. This scheme is promoted as an automated trading platform that ensures you will participate in real-time transactions placed or executed by a skilled and knowledgeable third party. Supposedly, whenever that party executes a trade, the same trade is mechanically placed in your account. Be cautious. Continue to objectively evaluate all new investment platforms.

9. Private placements. A federal rule that provides filing exemption for private placement offerings has been used by unscrupulous promoters. This year U.S. and Canadian authorities convicted three people of criminal fraud related to the sale of $33 million in oil and gas private placement offerings. The defendants claimed the securities were exempt from registration under Rule 506. They organized their company in the Bahamas, sold the securities from a boiler room in Ontario, and told investors the company was located in Kentucky.

10. Advice from unlicensed agents. Complaints are on the rise about unlicensed salesmen, such as insurance agents, who give investment advice or make securities transactions. Recommendations often turn out to be unsuitable or put investors in underperforming products or those with hidden fees or long lockup periods. Insist that anyone giving you advice produce a proper license. [Brad Huebner / BH Group should be able to “relate” to this one, did you see our post about him pushing that crappy LDHL Penny Stock scheme?  LINK ]


DO YOU KNOW OF A SCAM GOING AROUND THAT NEEDS TO BE EXPOSED, LET US KNOW ABOUT IT USING OUR ANONYMOUS FORM:

This Day In RV History – July 3, 2011 – Calls RV w/ Attorney & Banker's Exclusive Rate!!! LOL!!!

HAT TIP:  DinarRecaps (archive July 3, 2011)


Okay happy Tuesday, but today is not July 3, 2011, but July 3, 2012, and the Hack Gurus are still saying the SAME garbage – calling for the RV every other day!!!  As you scroll down in the text below, near the bottom, I highlight in “bold red” the key sections!

But, what a laugh, they are saying their inside Attorney / Banker friends have special access to FOREX Rates and can cash in with signature loans based on the rate and the amount of Dinar you have!

By the way, this is the foundation of a potential SCAM perpetrated (which we believe is still under investigation by the FBI) on this community allegedly by Brad Huebner and his BH Group along with Rudy Coenen and his Bayshore Capital.

We posted about this potential scam, you can read about it here!

So keep this in mind, those sharks are still swimming and feeding in our Dinarian ocean!  Tread carefully!

~ Mr. IQD


Dewey’s Dinar Round Table Call Sunday Night- Featuring Poppy2, Okie, Dewey, Dusty
Transcript and Recording linkRECORDING LINK 74 minutes  (NOTE: RECORDING LINK NO LONGER WORKS!)(TY Katt at OOMF for posting the following transcript of the call (LONG))[dinarmama7]Iraq is a sovereign nation and inducted into WTO
[dinarmama7]If that is true, the RV has occurindigo
[dinarmama7]documentation will show up
[dinarmama7]they have several days to do that
[dinarmama7]his thing will rattle our cages
[albosdo]Poppy: This thing will rattle our cages.
[dinarmama7]My personal opinion is we will see it Tues am
[dinarmama7]new DFI manager named
[dinarmama7]new IMF completed
[albosdo]June 30, that has been completed, has been notified.
[dinarmama7]notified in paper, been on our global news
[dinarmama7]next step is for you and I to see this thing on CBI and Forex
[dinarmama7]and be able to cash in
Continue reading

Hedge Fund – Risk Management in the Post-Madoff Era of Fraud!!!

HAT TIP: Risk Management Magazine


We are really concerned with helping to provide the tools (and a tad bit of common sense) that will help you to better protect yourself against some of the current SCAMS being waged against us in the Dinarian Community!

One of the biggest threats are these Hedge Funds being sold, which in our opinion are being sold by unreliable, and possibly down right blatant con artists!!!

This article from Risk Management Magazine was written by Pat Huddleston, here is his short bio, and link to his blog:

Pat Huddleston served as the enforcement branch chief of the SEC’s enforcement division from 1992 to 1996. He currently lives in Atlanta as founder and CEO of Investor’s Watchdog, an investor protection company. You can read more from Huddleston on his company’s blog, Investor’s Watchblog.

We hope that you read this, and share this with  your fellow IQD investor friends.

~ Mr. IQD


by Pat Huddleston

From 1977 to 1982, Larry Wilcox was a television star, playing officer Jon Baker opposite Eric Estrada in the hit NBC television series CHiPs. When he left the small screen, Wilcox branched out into other business ventures. He remained far out of the limelight until October 2010, when the U.S. Justice Department charged him with participating in a microcap stock scam that involved bribing pension plan employees. In November 2010, Wilcox pled guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit securities fraud. 

Wilcox’s fraud was a classic “pump and dump” scheme, in which the fraudsters control worthless shares of small companies, pump up the price of those shares with rigged trading and false press releases and then sell the shares to innocent investors. The SEC will stop dozens of such scams this year (and every year). Luckily, no investors lost money in the Wilcox case; the corrupt pension fund employees were actually undercover FBI agents. 

Most pump and dump stories don’t end so well. In the late 1990s, Russian mob boss Semion Mogilevich — now on the FBI’s Most Wanted list — made the Toronto Stock Exchange and prominent Canadian politicians unwitting players in a $150 million pump and dump scam involving shares in Pennsylvania-based sham company YBM Magnex International, Inc., which was purported to be a worldwide manufacturer of industrial magnets. After the FBI and other authorities raided the company’s headquarters in 1998, exposing the fraud, its shares fell to zero. The fraud victimized not only individual investors, but also institutions, including mutual funds and the Ontario Teacher’s Pension Fund. 

Whether it is a pump and dump scheme or any other scam, avoiding professional investment fraud is not easy. Professional con artists are well funded and as skilled in their craft as world-class athletes. Not falling victim begins with admitting that you are…  (to continue reading, please goto original blog post)